• Marilee Driscoll

    Long-term care insurance determines how well you'll be taken care of when you can't take care of yourself.

    Long-term care insurance is potentially one of the most important purchases you'll ever make. It likely determines how well you'll be taken care of when you can no longer care for yourself.

    There are lots of decisions to make -- and they need to be informed decisions. Tempting as it is to think you'll never be in the position to need long-term care, you risk literally everything if you hide from this issue.

    Read complete article
  • A diagnosis of Alzheimer’s has more than just medical implications — there are financial issues, too.

    An estimated 5 million people in the United States have Alzheimer's disease; this number is expected to double by the year 2050 as the elderly segment of our population grows. Not only does the disease have a significant emotional impact on individuals and their families, it also causes severe family financial burden and places considerable demands on the greater public health system. 

    Read complete article
  • Head x-ray

    Use your head to learn the risks, take precautions, and avoid a horrible outcome.

    We sometimes joke about our heads: Knock your head against the wall ... Head bashing ... Dropped on your head ... and more. Funny -- except it's no laughing matter.

    Even a head injuriy that appears to be mild can have serious, long-term effects, especially when there are repeated injuries.

    Read complete article
  • ADVISOR ANSWERS

    Q: What is pre-diabetes? How is it different from Type 2 diabetes?
    -- Malcolm M. in Boston, Massachusetts

    Read complete article
  • Hot sun

    Our risk of hyperthermia problems increases with age

    Summertime, and the living is...hot -- TOO HOT. Alas, we are less able to handle hot days as we age. The wonderful summertime of youth can become a serious problem for a Senior. Heat-related illnesses, known as hyperthermia, can include heat stroke, heat fatigue, heat syncope (sudden dizziness after exercising in the heat), heat cramps and heat exhaustion. Here's advice to help older people avoid these problems.

    Read complete article
  • Older adults and those in the hospital are at increased risk for deep vein thrombosis (DVT).

    Every year, approximately 2 million Americans are affected by deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a blood clot in the thigh or leg. Approximately 600,000 experience pulmonary embolism (PE). For up to 200,000 of those with PE, the blood clot in the lung proves fatal -- almost twice as many deaths per year as AIDS, breast cancer, and highway fatalities combined.

    Read complete article
  • Ambulance and Emergency Room

    Don't assume the ER knows best.

    You'd think a hospital would be very good at being very careful. Maybe so -- but not necessarily when Boomers and Seniors visit the Emergency Room (ER).

    In fact, it is common for older patients to receive potentially inappropriate medications when treated in an emergency room or clinic.

    Read complete article
  • People covered by Medicare have different options each year.

    Choices range from Original Medicare to a variety of Medicare supplemental plans. The right choice next time might not be the same as last time. It's an important decision about a complex matter, so make sure you know how it works.

    NOTE: This article was written before Affordable Care Act (ACA) took effect in 2014. ACA does not focus on Medicare, but it may affect some of the information in this article. As always, you should consult insurance experts to determine what is right for you.

    Read complete article
  • Barbara Barnes sporting gorgeous gray hair

    Tired of the time and effort it takes to banish your gray hair? Maybe it's time to embrace it.

    I was at the beauty salon waiting to have my hair highlighted when my hairdresser sighed, "This just isn't going to work anymore." — my situation demanded a new set of chemicals. But I wondered, why am I doing this? What's wrong with gray hair? Here's my answer. 

    Read complete article
  • Mobility-adapted car

    Don't let mobility challenges slow you down.

    One in five people will experience some type of disability in their lifetime. When your own or a loved one's personal mobility becomes a problem, the restrictions on your daily life can be overwhelming. Suddenly there are limits on where you can go, what you can do, and who you can visit.

    Many people in this situation have decided to not let personal mobility limitations get in their way. While life may never be exactly as it was, there are solutions — mobility aids.

    Read complete article
  • ADVISOR ANSWERS

    Q: My mom is insured through a Medicare HMO; however, the hospital closest to her home is not in her HMO's network. What do we do if there's an emergency? I don't know if we would instruct the ambulance to go to a different hospital -- is that even possible or advisable? She doesn't want to get hit with a big hospital bill because she isn't covered.
    -- Willa M., Rainbow, California

    Read complete article
  • Janet Neilson

    What really happens in Canada?

    Americans are familiar with the stories of Canadians who would have died because of their government's health care rationing had they not been able to get care in the United States. Perhaps just as troubling, however, are the less dramatic but much more common instances of minor indignities, inequities and inconveniences imposed by the Canadian health care system.

    Read complete article
  • Adult incontinence is common, yet it can be a difficult subject to discuss with family, friends, and even physicians.

    Adult incontinence is much more prevalent in the United States than you might think. According to the National Association of Continence (NAFC, 2006), approximately 25 million adults in this country have experienced incontinence at some point in their lives. In fact, this number may be higher as most adults, especially men, won't admit or are embarrassed to discuss this condition with their healthcare provider, family, or friends. And 75-80 percent of those suffering incontinence are women.

    Read complete article
  • Warrior 05

    Progress has been made in War On Cancer, but we face many challenges

    We seem to be waging war on many fronts: drugs, crime, illegal immigration, drunk driving, Afghanistan, Iraq, terrorists in general, terrorism on airplanes in particular. But our most serious war -- the one most likely to affect all of us -- is one we are still losing: The War on Cancer.

    Read complete article
  • The best approach depends on your age.

    Stroke ranks higher than heart attack in scaryness, say surveys. So stroke prevention is something we all care about.

    Of the two main stroke-prevention procedures, new research points to which is the better choice.

    Read complete article

Pages